THE FESTIVAL

How does the Nitrate Picture Show differ from the Turner Classic Movies Classic Film Festival. Well, in a couple of tangible and intangible ways.

The Nitrate Picture Show ( NPS ) is held in the Dryden Theater of the George Eastman House. For the cost~conscious of us, the NPS is one/one-billionth the price of the TCMFF. Their highest priced ticket is $250. This is a pretty significant tangible difference.

The NPS holds its screening in one venue while the TCMFF has screenings in the historic settings of Grauman’s Chinese, the Egyptian and sometimes El Capitan. There’s less pressure to get to a screening at the Nitrate, because it’s all right there in the Eastman Museum, even though there’s still really not enough time to eat. I’d liken the TCMFF as a marathon…or a sprint, rushing from place to place, while this festival is a quick stroll.

  

  • One can tackle the NPS film schedule in one fell swoop. You don’t have to choose between your kidney or your heart as you peruse the schedule, but like the TCMFF, they don’t reveal their schedule until almost festival time.
  • The TCMFF is like a populist event, and the NPS is a little more scholarly. Saw and heard more academic eggheads running around than folks in Marx Bros.’ t~shirts. Somewhat serious cineastes.
  • Seems as the NPS has outreach to more serious cinematic institutions around the world who proffer their nitrate prints to this Rochester event. But maybe now that the Egyptian has re~done its projection booth, more nitrates will come through Hollywood.
  • Heard more chortling during the NPS screenings than I’ve heard in my seven years attending the TCMFF. What UP with that?!! THAT was disconcerting. Will share a coupla Tweets on THAT score here—> INDIE WIRE backs me up.

* * * * * * * * *

 * * * * * * * * *

 

Here are some of the folks that put this festival together and introduced the films.

 

THE AUDIENCE APPLAUDS THE FESTIVAL’S PROJECTIONISTS

* * * * * * * * *

THE GEORGE EASTMAN MUSEUM SPACE AND FESTIVAL HANGOUT

THE PASS HOLDER’S LOUNGE

THE EASTMAN HOUSE CAFETERIA ( BEFORE )

THE EASTMAN HOUSE CAFETERIA ( AFTER )

DOWN THE CORRIDOR TO THE MEN’S AND LADIES’ ROOMS

* * * * * * * * *

Receiving FB notifications requires an answer. Several answers…

 

* * * * * * * * *

EASTMAN HOUSE MUSEUM

HUNDREDS OF TECHNICOLOR DYE BOTTLES

OLD~TIMEY PROJECTORS

* * * * * * * * *

THE GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE

Wendy wanted to take the tour of the Eastman House itself, so a touring we went. I’m not so big on tours, but I’m so glad I went. The docent who guided us through the House was quite knowledgeable and passionate about her subject. She really made George Eastman come alive. I had a lump in my throat by the end of the tour. The inventor of Kodak film, a devoted son, he was also a philanthropist, giving millions of dollars to colleges, including Tuskeegee Institute. Discovered to have a progressive spinal disease he ended his life by putting  a gun to his chest on March 14 1932.

“My work is done. Why wait?”

Click the photos to go to links about this very amazing man.

By the time George Eastman was 36 years old, he was a millionaire. And look at him in that older portrait. Doesn’t he look like Samuel S. Hinds? The rooms in the house were opulent and functional.  Didn’t take many pictures; I was just so stunned.

 

* * * * * * * * *

EATS

The weekend was a wash, it rained the entire time we were there. But we didn’t let that stop us from eating. Park Avenue is a restaurant row near the Museum, with all different types of cuisine dotting the boulevard. Here are two places we dined at:

[  NITRATE HOME PAGE  ]