BLOGATHON DIRECTORY ~ 2016

 

If you’re looking for some reading material, look no further. These bloggers, either alone or in a collaborative effort, have hosted blogathons throughout 2016. This is no mean feat putting these blogathons together, trust me I know. Lots of coordinating of time and e~mails with bloggers and co~hosts. Some listed below of are perennial favorites, while others are one time events you should jump on. I’ve tried to link you to each blogathon’s wrap~up page, but if there is none, I’ll direct you to Day 0ne of the blogathon and you can search for the rest on your own. ( I think I did the hard part ~ L0L! ) If I’ve gotten your link wrong or left out your blogathon, do let me now. I know our lives get mighty busy during the year. If you have any time to chill out and relax, here’s some reading to keep you informed and warm with memories of some great films:

 

blogathon-backs-stage-1-15-18-2016 blogathon-barbara-stanwyck-1-19-20-2016 blogathon-france-on-film-ii-1-8-9-2016 loretta-young-blogathon-ii blogathon-o-canada-2-1-5-2016 blogathon-buster-keaton-2-7-8symbiotic-collaborations-von-sternberg-ii blogathon-a-kiss-is-just-a-kiss-2-13-14-2016blogathon-acting-black-blogathon-215-17-2016 blogathon-flash-blogathon-2-18-22-2016  blogathon-movie-scientist-iii  blogathon-valentino-3-27-2016blogathon-in-like-a-lion-228-31 blogathon-classic-quote-blogathon-3-4-6-2016blogathon-31-days-of-oscar-blogathon-2016 blogathon-oscar-snubs-2-26-28-2016 blogathon-the-dot-blogathon-ii-3-11-13-2016blogathon-tv-sidekicks-3-6-8-2016 blogathon-marathon-stars-3-10-12-2016blogathon-favorite-tv-show-episode-3-25-27-2016  blogathon-bette-davis-i-4-3-5-2016blogathon-book-to-cover-4-8-10-2016 blogathon-blogathon-from-another-world-49-10-2016 blogathon-golden-boy-william-holden-4-15-17-2016 blogathon-star-studded-couple-4-22-25-2016 blogathon-audrey-hepburn-5-3-4-2016 blogathon-disability-in-film-5-13-15-2016blogathon-words-words-words-4-11-15-2016blogathon-gotta-dance-5-25-2016 blogathon-the-great-katharine-hepburn-5-12-14-2016 blogathon-great-villain-ii-5-15-20-2016  blogathon-five-movies-on-an-island-5-16-2016 blogathon-animals-in-film-5-26-28-206blogathon-ice-cream-social-ii-5-20-23-2016 blogathon-athletes-in-film-6-4-5-2016 blogathon-reel-infatuations-ii blogathon-sex-blogathon-6-19-21-2016blogathon-natures-fury-blogathon-6-18-20-2016 blogathon-royalty-on-film-6-2-5-2016 joan-crawford-blogathonii-7-28-30-2016order-in-the-court-second-sight-cinema

ray-harryhausen-blogathon-7-10-15-2016 sword-sandal-blogathon-i-7-8-10-2016 british-invasion-8-5-7-2016blogathon-classic-movie-history-project-i-8-5-10-2016 olivia-dehavilland-blogathon-7-1-3-2016 film-noir-blogathon-8-12-14-2016 barrymore-trilogy-blogathon-8-15-17-2016 blogathon-ingrid-bergman-ii-8-27-29-2016

back-to-school-blogathon  blogathon-margaret-lockwood-9-13-15-2016  sci-fi-movies-of-1950s-blogathon-9-26-28-2016 dual-roles-blogathon-930-1022016 learned-from-movies-10-1417-2016monty-python-blogathon-10-1-3-2016  hollywood-on-hollywood-blogathon-10-17-21-2016

hail-to-the-chief-10-28-11-1-2016 joel-mccrea-blogathon-11-4-6-2016  grace-kelly-blogathon-11-12-2016great-imaginary-blogathon-1111132016 circus-blogathon-11-12-13-2016 friends-blogathon-11-18-20-2016 cartoon-2016-blogathon cary-grant-blogathon-i kirk-douglas-blogathon-champion

agnes-moorehead-blogathon-12-4-6-2016  john-wayne-blogathon-12-9-11-2016  vincente-minnelli-blogathon-12-16-18-2016what-a-character-2016-12-16-18-2016  bogart-blogathon-12-20-23-2016

ALL ABOUT EVE

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( April 30th, 1908 ~ November 12th, 1990 )

Wisecracking. One~liners. Devastating delivery. If you’re cynical, you might say she’s played the same part over and over again. To that I say, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, because over and over again, a girl’s best friend is EVE ARDEN.

  eve-arden-iiiiiii eve-arden-ii

♠  ♠    ♠  ♠

friends-blogathon-11-18-20-2016Entering Moon In Gemini’s “YOU GOTTA HAVE FRIENDS!” blogathon ( click the banner to read more entries on the nature of friendship in the movies ) Eve Arden’s name comes immediately to mind . She doesn’t have ‘Oomph’ or ‘It’ or play the bombshell. Men consider her a ‘pal.’ But I think she is sexy in her own right if you like the level~headed gal, who could drink her whisky straight and tell you like it is. There’s beauty in that. Besides, I think she IS pretty attractive. If you’re a woman, she’d be a valuable ‘consigliere’ to tell you what you need to hear, not want to hear. And while she’s pinched you if she has to with her tart tongue, she’ll bite the heads off those who try to hurt you. In movies she’s rarely in a relationship though in real life she had a husband and children. eve-arden-husband-kidsHer screen self basically travels alone, a self~sufficient, self~contained, self~aware single woman. She floats through society with the greatest of ease…unencumbered, pollinating quips, wisecracks and bon mots as she rolls along. Eve Arden made 99 movies between 1929 and 1987. Younger audiences might remember her as Principal McGee in Grease. If they were smart like the rest of us, they’d do well to explore Eve Arden in all her younger movie career glory.

♠  ♠    ♠  ♠

THE ARNELO AFFAIR ( 1947 ) [ Vivian ] 

eve-arden-iiii eve-arden-iii eve-arden-xxvi

Vivian is good friends with Ann ( Frances Gifford ) who used to be an interior decorator and who’s now a wife with a son and husband who is a workaholic. Vivian’s there for moral support and a shoulder to lean on, on her way to her own boutique, with sage advice for Ann when the frances-gifford-arnelo-affairmore attentive and slickly handsome John Hodiak starts making a play for her and feeding her grapes. Eve’s clothes are wonderfully over the top…but it’s that same devastating delivery. And even over~the~top, Eves got the frame and statuesque figure to be a clothes horse like Kay Francis. << Sigh!  >> Has Edith Head ever dressed Arden?

eve-arden-the-arnelo-affair

“You know Ann, just give me a plate of bacon and eggs, a full pocketbook, a chinchilla coat and a man and I’m happy. I’m such a simple girl.”

♠  ♠    ♠  ♠

THE UNFAITHFUL ( 1947 ) [ PAULA ]

Eve Arden shows who she is from the first. Her character throws a party for herself to announce she’s back on the market:

ARDEN: “The time has come to tell you why I gave this party. Come in closer. Six years ago I committed a crime against society. I married a man. Anyway I’ve taken my punishment and I was pardoned. Or was it paroled?”

Friend: “Divorced.”

ARDEN: “Don’t be crude. Now I want to pay a tribute to the man who made all this possible. Larry Hanniford. Larry take a bow. Am I embarassing you?”

Larry: “You are.”

ARDEN: “I’m so glad.”

Larry: “Besides, I only do the paperwork. The rest I leave to the ladies.”

ARDEN: “Don’t you believe it. This morning he stood in court and made a speech that belongs to History. In twenty minutes I was a free woman. I’m now again on the open market. Do I hear any bidders? My hair is my own. My teeth is my own. Well, practically everything is my own. Speak up Gentlemen.”

Husband ( enters ): “Go on! Tell ‘em! Tell ‘em all about it! Tell ‘em how wonderful you are. Then I’ll tell ‘em a few things.”

ARDEN: “Well the corpse at the post~mortem. What’s the matter, did I forget something when I packed your things? What do YOU want!”

Husband: “I wanna sock you right in the jaw.”

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is our introduction to the very caustic, newly~minted divorcee Paula in “The Unfaithful.” Arden plays Ann Sheridan’s cousin~in~law. And she’s rather a bitch.

There’s a good scene in the restaurant when Arden  and her harpy side-kicks ( Peggy Knudsen and Jane Harker ) come over to give their “condolences” to Sheridan for the trouble she’s in. All they really want  is to gossip and drop innuendoes. They’re pretty transparent about it.

Friend #1 [ to Sheridan ]: “…I must say you look awfully well considering what you’ve been through.”

ARDEN: “Really Joan.”

Friend #1: “Oh, I could bite my tongue in half.”

ARDEN: “You’d have plenty left.”

She feigns leaving but stays longer to get some more dirt about this scandal. But as the movie goes on, I have to say, when the chips are really down Arden comes through. Yes she chatters on…

ARDEN: “Chris! Darling you weren’t even listing to me.”

Sheridan: “Oh I’m sorry. Would you like some more coffee?”

ARDEN: “Oh Heavens no. I’m going to meet the crowd downtown and I want those cocktails to have plenty of room.”

But I do love her heartfelt change of heart when she deeply apologizes for her behavior…in her own ‘Eve Arden-ish’ way:

“Chris. I know you won’t believe this. I’m awfully sorry about all this. Too bad we were never friends. ‘Course I know you don’t approve of me. But I don’t approve of me either.”

eve-arden-iiiiii

Arden has a good strong scene with Zachary Scott when she has to tell him some hard truths about himself. No irony, no snide~ness. Just straight talk. Eve Arden is wonderful in this scene and director Vincent Sherman lets her have all of it:

This film deals with adultery and its extenuating circumstances; It doesnt treat the wife like she’s at the Salem witch trials. I like this movie for many reasons. Eve Arden is one of them.

♠  ♠    ♠  ♠

MY DREAM IS YOURS” ( 1948 )  [ VIVIAN ]

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Eve co~stars with the new girl on the Warner Brothers lot: DORIS DAY in her second motion picture. Eve is on the behind~the~scene end of show biz when talent scout Doug Blake ( the affable Jack Carson ) brings this blonde bundle of energy to the West Coast to break in to that biz called show. He bulldozes Arden to take in Day as a roomie, and puts the bite on her to also take in Day’s little boy and overgrown dog:

eve-arden-xxiiii

Doug: “Vi, isn’t he wonderful?”

ARDEN: “Yeah, cutest little lease-breaker I ever saw. Where’s his mother?

Doug: “She’s downstairs, she wasn’t sure how you’d take this.”

ARDEN: “Yeah I’ll bet.”

He even convinces her to pawn her favorite ( and only ) mink coat to loan him the cash to put Day over. Arden’s a pal alright. Or is she a patsy? She’s a good sport about it all, ultimately looking out for Doris like a big sister… with one eyebrow raised. Arden also plays Day’s friend in “Tea For Two” in this re~working of 1920’s No No Nanette.” It’s fun watching Arden spar with Billy De Wolfe.

♠  ♠    ♠  ♠

MY REPUTATION ( 1946 ) [ GINNA ] 

Barbara Stanwyck is a strong woman in the movies, right? Well not in this 1946 woman’s picture. And I use strong quotes not to put the movie down in that category the way it’s usually used. But for a story specific to women who may need to give themselves permission to live again…or be responsible only to herself. Or at least Her Self FIRST. Stanwyck suffers from “DMS” = the Domineering Mother Syndrome of “Now, Voyager.” This time Mother is played by Lucile Watson, as usually played by women who look like conjugal duties clearly were a duty. Now Stanwyck doesn’t quite have the breakdown our neurotic Charlotte Vale does, but she does melt down a bit.  Stany’s a widow, feeling some built up pressure from a nice steady vanilla friend of her husband’s, two growing boys and what her social set ( and Mother ) expect of her. She can’t take it. And who does she lean on? You guessed it…her best friend Ginna played by the object of my affection: Eve Arden. And you and I and Eve Arden knows exactly ‘what~she~needs.’ 

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Jessica [crying]: “I don’t know what’s the matter with me. I seem to be going to pieces!”

ARDEN: “It isn’t only the body that breaks down, Jess. The mind can go too, you know.”

Again Arden is the urbane friend, fancy apartment. Shoulder to lean on. But this time the script actually has her as married…to the ubiquitous John Ridgely. And she’s not the domineering wife either. He good~naturedly tolerates her but keeps her in check. Arden is quieter in this movie. She invites Stanwyck out to their ski lodge to spend a weekend. Fresh air and downhill skiing will take the ‘edge’ off of what ails you. ‘Meeting cute’ will take care of the rest.

It’s a cinch that Stanwyck can’t talk to the dames in her tony set. Arden is outside the she~wolf pack.

♠  ♠  ♠  ♠  ♠

ANATOMY OF A MURDER” ( 1958 ) [ MAIDA ]

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This is a great courtroom drama from Otto Preminger, starring James Stewart, George C. Scott, Lee Remick, Ben Gazzara and Arthur O’Connell. Good cast, good story. Eve Arden plays Maida the office Secretary for James Stewart’s Paul Biegler. You can see she’s the chief cook and bottle washer for Stewart’s law office. She’s his quiet supportive cheerleader sitting in the courtroom. And quietly, good~naturedly admonishes him.

“If this refrigerator gets any more ish in it, it will swim upstream and spawn all by itself.”

~  OR ~

Paul:  “You’re fired.”

ARDEN: “You can’t fire me until you pay me.”

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Click here –> Anatomy of a Murder (1959) from Aitor Garcia on Vimeo.

She’s not harsh or brash. She downplays the brightness of her delivery.  She’s quieter. She doesnt have to punch these lines because we already know who she is. In my mind, I like to think of her Maida, and Jimmy Stewart’s Paul Biegler having a quiet drink in their office or at the local inn listening to jazz after a trying day in court.

…And then having some quiet comfort together back in her apartment. She’s a pal. She’s a woman. She’s in your corner. She’s a friend.

♠  ♠    ♠  ♠

STAGEDOOR ( 1937 ) [ EVE ]

In a sea of beautiful girls with quick quips and wisecracks, Eve Arden stands out with her cat, her champagne voice and the effortlessness of skill.

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A pleasant little foursome. I predict a hatchet murder before the night’s over.

♠  ♠    ♠  ♠

And of course…

MILDRED PIERCE”  ( 1945 ) [ IDA ] 

eve-arden-xxviiiThis is the creme de la creme of friendship with this film. ( Arden works again with Crawford in 1950Goodbye My Fancy” ). Eve plays Ida, the first person to give Joan Crawford’s Mildred Pierce a job as a waitress. She shows her the ropes and guides her. When Mildred branches out with her own franchises, who’s right there helping manage her businesses? And who’s there to advocate for the waitresses when she has to tell Mildred Veda is borrowing money from them? Ida sees Monty Beragon for the  heel he is before Mildred…is ready to admit it. Ida drops some lovely words of contempt on Monty for good measure. And she has a wonderful retort for Wally’s admiring ogle. I present IDA:

  • “Leave something on me. I might catch cold.”
  • “When men get around me, they get allergic to wedding rings.”

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  • Monty: “Oh I wish I could get that interested in work.”
    ARDEN: “You were probably frightened by a callus at an early age.”
  • “Oh men. I never yet met one of them that didn’t have the instincts of a heel. Sometimes I wish I could get along without them.”
  • ARDEN: “Laughing boy seems slightly burned at the edges. What’s eating him?”
    Mildred: “A small green~eyed monster.”
    ARDEN: “Jealous? That doesn’t sound like Wally. No profit in it ~ and there’s a boy who loves a dollar.”
  • “Personally Veda’s convinced me that alligators have the right idea. They eat their young.”

       

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G
ee…a great collection of the 1940’s right here in “THE DOUGHGIRLS.”

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She floats above the fray of everyday heartache. She’s smart. She’s a business woman. She’s wise. In most of her appearances she’s not the bombshell who gets home and hearth. It’s not that she doesn’t want it. What does Ida say in “Mildred Pierce” that when men get around her they see her as a pal. Well I for one would be glad to have her as a pal. I’ve said it before and I say it, Eve Arden is the best friend a girl could have.
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D’ya want to read about some other great friendships in classic film? Well just click on Bob & Bing and read many more entries. And if you want to read a more in~depth view of Arden’s performance as Ida in “Mildred Pierce” read the blog post at Once Upon A Screen. Thank you Debra for hosting and sharing this great idea for a blogathon. Hmmmm…think I’d better call my best friend now.

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IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND (1951)

 

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HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH is here once more ( Sept. 15th ~ Oct. 15th ) and in Hollywood’s Golden Era, Hispanics have been represented in a variety of ways. This month, the world of classic film blogs will feature the talents of many Hispanics in films. Two popular bloggers: ( Aurora ) ONCE UPON A SCREEN  and ( Raquel ) OUT OF THE PAST will use all platforms of social media to feature the Latino experience in films. Look for the hashtag #DePelicula on Twitter, FaceBook, Tumblr and Instagram and peruse to your heart’s content.

In Film Noir, there is nothing better than to see a man engineer his own destruction. Maybe that’s why I love the genre. Arturo de Córdova is handsome enough and believable enough to fit that bill nicely. I made several trips to the Museum of Modern Art here in NYC to see their collection of Mexican films noir last summer during their Mexico At Midnight programming. Boy did I get an education in just how Mexico handled films from their golden age of cinema, and got an eye-fullllll! ( But more about María Félix another time. )  In “En La Palma De Tu Mano” ( “In the Palm Of Your Hand” ) directed by Roberto Gavaldónde Córdova is cocksure and confident…the perfect mark.

PALM ( IIII )

He plays a psychic. A dyed-in-the-wool, crystal ball-gazing, palm-reading, sooth-saying, phony baloney. This film brings “The Postman Always Rings Twice” and “Nightmare Alley” to mind. I enjoy the chockful of plot “In the Palm Of Your Hand” has. De Córdova is a smooth operator.  He has a long-term girlfriend who he:

  • Sleeps with
  • Takes for granted
  • Uses to get her to funnel clients to him from her beauty salon

PALM ( VI )

It’s an ingenious idea using salon customers; after all, a beauty salon is fraught with women letting their hair down < a-hem > and revealing all sorts of secrets, which in turn Psychic de Córdova pretends he knows. Why she does this for him is anybody’s guess in film noir; love, I suppose. Actress Carmen Montejo makes us sympathize with her for loving this cad. She’s a nice girl. Love. Obsession. You know how it goes. The girlfriend lets de Córdova know of a customer who has just come into a lot of pesos thanks to a conveniently deceased wealthy husband. This is de Córdova’s “victim” who’ll pay off big.  A black widow. Ev’ry Noir needs one. 

PALM ( II ) PALM ( VII )

He’s not above lying, manipulating, bamboozling, blackmailing or sweet pillow-talking his way to get her money. This will be his last score because with her money, he can quit the phony sooth-sayer business and start anew with his girlfriend.

PALM ( III )

…And if you know film noir like I know film noir, you know that ain’t never gonna happen!

He calls the shots as he wades deeper and deeper into the Black Widow’s quicksand. The Widow is played by Leticia Palma. She’s cruelly beautiful and laughs in his face. But she has to play the game too if she wants de Córdova’s help. She gets him to:

  • Dump his girlfriend ( Cad! Bastido! )
  • Kill her nephew-in-law / lover
  • Bury him and
  • Dig him up again.

Ha!…And de Córdova thinks  he’s calling the shots.

In film noir, bad decisions dig a hole for the hero. He’s not all bad. de Córdova does show an iota of compassion to an illiterate newspaper stand lady, whose son is in the military. Director Gavaldón has good command of suspense. He crafts a wonderfully tense moment when a pesky traffic cop offers to help the runaway couple ( Palma and de Córdova ) with a flat tire…while there’s a corpse in the trunk. 

PALM ( V )

De Córdova is put through the ringer in this film. He goes from cocksure to frazzled to defeated. The hunter gets captured by the game. I will not spoil the ending for you. It is pure genius. It actually shows you fate doesn’t have to trip you up. It can stand in the corner and watch you hoist yourself on your own petard. 

♦  ♦  ♦  ♦

If you wish to play catch~up to explore Hollywood’s Hispanic Heritage click on these banner for 2014 and 2015.

 

HOLLYWOOD'S HISPANIC HERITAGE ( 2014 ) - 1HOLLYWOOD'S HISPANIC HERITAGE BLOGATHON ( 2015 )
(   H O M E   )

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HOT & BOTHERED: The Films of 1932

🙂 WELCOME. PREPARE TO BE HOT and BOTHERED. 🙂

Aurora and I have done our best to put you in that “pre~code” mood. And 1932 is just the year that can do it, too. 

HOT & BOTHERED BLOGATHON ~ ( Shanghai Express )  HOT & BOTHERED BLOGATHON ~ ( A Farewell to Arms )  HOT & BOTHERED BLOGATHON ~ ( Call Her Savage )  HOT & BOTHERED BLOGATHON ~ ( Sign of the Cross )

I am pleased as punch to have been co-hosting this event with one of the classic-film writers I truly admire. I’ve wanted to work with her since forever but her dance card was always full. Well now I have. Her blog, ONCE UPON A SCREEN, has been involved with such annual stalwart events as the ‘What A Character‘, ‘Hollywood’s Hispanic Heritage‘ and the ‘31 Days of Oscar‘ Blogathons. When I told Aurora I wanted to talk about films from 1932, a year we both think was pretty pivotal in the annals of pre~code, she came up with the title of my blogathon and agreed to co~host it with me. If you ever need an Ideas Maven or advice on blogathon etiquette folks, Aurora ( aka Citizen Screen) is your gal. 

HOT POSTER ( WHITE )

If you go to Fernando’s Corner here on my blog, you can read his take on three films from 1932: The Animal Kingdom” “Hot Saturday” and “Madame Butterfly.” 

I realize a blogathon is only as good as the writers who choose to join it. So below is the roster of all the bloggers who participated in our event this past weekend. I’m sending a big thank you to each and every one of them. We’ve got a wide, delectable variety of films from 1932 for you to luxuriate in…but don’t think you’ve got to rush. Take your slow, sweet time. I mean, that’s the only way to be Hot and Bothered, isn’t it.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
AMERICAN MADNESS ( SHELLY BLOG )
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
BACK STREET ~ MEREDY'S PLACE
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
BEAST OF THE CITY ~ CAFTAN WOMAN
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
BETTY BOOP ( BLOG OF THE DARNED )
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
BLONDE VENUS ( CINEMA CITIES )
 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
CALL HER SAVAGE ( TYPO )
 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
CYNARA - ( TRUDY RING ~ Guest Writer )
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
DANCERS IN THE DARK ( CLASSIC REEL GIRL )
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
THE DARK HORSE ( APOCALYPSE LATER )
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
THE DENTIST ( MOVIE MOVIE BLOG BLOG )
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
HOT & BOTHERED BLOGATHON
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
FREAKS ( CRITICA RETRO )
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
GRAND HOTEL ( SECOND SIGHT CINEMA )
 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
HORSE FEATHERS ( PILLOW SHOTS )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
I AM A FUGITIVE FROM A CHAIN GANG
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
HOT & BOTHERED ( %22Island of Lost Souls%22 ~ II )
  
 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
LAW & ORDER ( CLASSIC FILM-FLICKERS OF )
 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
THE MONSTER WALKS!
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
MOST DANGEROUS GAME ( WIDE SCREEN WORLD )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
MOVIE CRAZY ( POST )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
FLAPPIN'
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
NO MORE ORCHIDS ( CAROLE & CO. )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
THE OLD DARK HOUSE ( SILVER SCREENINGS )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
THE PASSIONATE PLUMBER ( AN ODE TO DUST )
   ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
RAIN ( THE OLD HOLLYWOOD GARDEN )
   ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
RED DUST ( IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS OF CLASSIC HOLLYWOOD )
   ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
RED-HEADED WOMAN ( THE BASEMENT TAN )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
RICH & STRANGE ( WONDERFUL WORLD of CINEMA )
   ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
SCARFACE ( AMY'S RIB )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
SCARLET DAWN
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
HOT & BOTHERED ( %22SHANGHAI EXPRESS%22 )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
SIGN OF THE CROSS ( MOVIE MANIA MADNESS )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
SINNERS IN THE SUN ( PHYLLIS LOVES CLASSIC MOVIES )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
MOLLY LOUVAIN ( SHADOWS & SATIN )
   ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
TARZAN, THE APE MAN ~ WOLFFIAN CLASSICS
   ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
 TAXI! ( BACK TO GOLDEN DAYS )
   ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
THIRTEEN WOMEN ( THE STOP BUTTON )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
THREE BROADWAY GIRLS ( A CLASSIC MOVIE BLOG )
   ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
HOT & BOTHERED ( %22Trouble in Paradise%22 )
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20,000 YEARS IN SING SING ( Speakeasy )
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TWO SECONDS ( BNOIR DETOUR )
 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
UNASHAMED ( NOIRISH )
  ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
UNION DEPOT ( DREAMING IN THE BALCONY )
 

 

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TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( 1932 )

For my “HOT & BOTHERED” blogathon contribution, Ernst Lubitsch is the way to go. Why, this cheeky devil was able to slip all sorts of sexy mischief into Pre-Code films like “Design for Living” ( 1933 ) “The Smiling Lieutenant” ( 1931 ) or “The Merry Widow” ( 1934 ). He does so again.

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( VI )

Jewel thieves Herbert Marshall and Miriam Hopkins are partners-in crime ( are they even married? I s’pose they’re deliciously NOT in the wonderful world of pre-code ) in 1932’-Trouble in Paradise.” They are a deee-light to watch (…and trust me, no one is more shocked to hear me say that than me ) as they go after the big Kahuna, the raven-haired Kay Francis. Watching Marshall and Hopkins is like watching a tennis or fencing match; they volley’d and parried. Their oneupsmanship was as precise as a Swiss watch. Lying and stealing were compulsive for them. They couldn’t help themselves. Hopkins has to actually sit on her hands to keep from stealing Francis’ jewels.

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( II )

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( X )

When I first got a gander of Miriam Hopkins, I got scared. “Here we go,” I thought. “She’s all affected again.” When Lubitsch reveals her ruse, I laugh and relax and realize she’s handling the comedy very nicely. ( Uh-oh, I guess it’s time for me to break out “Design for Living”, huh? Baby steps, please. ) When she plays her scene with Francis, she’s pitch perfect. She’s now the dowdy secretary with horn-rimmed glasses after we’ve seen her in some stunning and devastating outfits. She has to play it cool, but they both understand each other in that way we women do when we’re competing for the same man. In their case, that man is Herbert Marshall.

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( XIII )

Who knew Marshall was spry and nimble ( though I know it wasn’t actually him bounding and sprinting up and down those stairs. ) He had a nimble way with the language of ‘sophisticated comedy’ and spoke it well. Why didn’t somebody tell me? His deadpan delivery and erudite diction works surprisingly well here. I say surprisingly because it’s a surprise to me, never having seen him this way. The last two times I saw Herbert Marshall he was:

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( %22Angel Face%22 )

(   1.  ) in a car going over a cliff in “Angel Face”  and

 

 

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( %22The Little Foxes%22 )(  2. ) dying on a staircase in “The Little Foxes”  with Bette Davis’ words: “I’ll be waiting for you to die,” ringing in his ears. ( This right after she confesses that with all her heart she “still loves the man she killed,” in 1940’s “The Letter.” ) That’s the stiff, staid Herbie Marshall I know.

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( XIV )Well here, in 1932, he’s nimble and sexy and a fast-talking, quick-thinker who talks his way out of any situation. He’s such a smooth talker, he turns the table on his accuser(s) until they are the ones who flee with guilt. He has a wonderful scene volleying with character actor C. Aubrey Smith. Marshall’s character should have been a politician instead of a thief; this way he could legally steal from his constituents…with their blessing!

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( III )

Kay Francis is no piker in all this. Yes, she’s the “straight man” here; the girl who’s about to be taken. But she’s fallen for the charming Marshall. She puts her complete faith, trust

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( XX )TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( XXI )TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( XV )TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( XXIII )

and business in his hands. He’s a cad, but why dont I dislike him? She woos him, somewhat vamps him. He thinks he’s out to get her, but she’s two steps ahead of him…and walking towards the boudoir. He’s falling for her. And she’s very smart.

What a handsome woman she is. I was struck by her darkness; black gowns and that jet black hair. She makes me think of sable, or a raven. She’s regal and smoky. She made quite a contrast to Miriam Hopkins soft dewy blonde, who is also quite beautiful in this film. 

( TIP ) KAY & HERBERT TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( IV )

The clothes in this movie are absolutely divine. Breathtaking. I’m not one who pays atten-tion to clothes, but I would have killed for any one outfit of Francis’ or Hopkins’ – especially this black number that Francis wears. I can’t describe it, but I swear, I swooned a little in my seat.  And if fashion IS your thing, a good article for you to read about Kay Francis and clothes in GlamAmor’s blog.

Clothes aside, I like that Francis’ character is oblivious to everything other than getting Marshall, but I think underneath she knows the score, and I like how this plays out. Lubitsch packs a lot of plot and moves things along swiftly. I like how he has a montage of servants responding to Francis, and a later montage of those same servants responding to Marshall. Lubitsch keeps the camera on a clock, and we just hear the voices in the scene, as time moves forward. He takes his time to let a character set up a joke so  when we hear the punchline later in the movie ( “TONSILS!” ) he trusts us to remember, and laugh. Oh he’s got The Touch alright. (( See the movie…find out what tonsils mean. ))

TROUBLE IN PARADISE ( VII )

Last but not least, another find for me are these two: Edward Everett Horton and Charles Ruggles. They were hilarious together, and made perfect foils for each other as they tried to out do each other to win Francis’ hand. Neither stood a snowball’s chance, if tall dark and handsome were on the scene. But it was great fun to watch them try, and to see them annoy and outwit each other.

When the jig is up, the movie ends beautifully, perfectly…justly. The lesson: we are all meant to be with whom we are meant to be with. I learned more than I bargained for from Lubitsch during this movie:

(  1. )  how to tell a story

(  2. )  how to present the story and

(  3. )  how to be a good sport when you lose the thing you
want…that’s not really meant for you. I shall hold Herbert
Marshall and Kay Francis as beacons in that regard. I’d do
well to remember that.

His situation is kind of sort of somewhat similar Rosalind Russell’s Hildy Johnson in His Girl Friday. Like her, he too must choose between two ways of life: guaranteed Stability or devil-may-care-Adventure. He’s a jewel thief going after big game: Kay Francis. He becomes enamored of her, flirts with the idea of being in love with her, falls into her lifestyle of the rich. But he’s also in a relationship with fellow traveler, Miriam Hopkins. ( They ‘meet cute’ in a thiefly sort of way. ) Push comes to shove for him and he has to choose between the stability and wealth of Francis world or the exhilaration of the game with Hopkins.  And don’t we all have to make a choice sometimes.

“Trouble in Paradise is my saucy bit of pre-code fluff to contribute to the blogathon I’m co-hosting with Aurora, author of the Once Upon A Screen blog. If you want to continue to be…hot and bothered ~  ( and who doesn’t ) ~ all you have to do is click on the banner below to see our roster of entries of like~minded, pre~code lovin’ fans. Enjoy!

HOT & BOTHERED BLOGATHON ~ ( Sign of the Cross )

 

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SYMBIOTIC COLLABORATIONS: A RE-VISIT

CLASSIC SYMBIOTIC COLLABORATIONS: THE STAR – DIRECTOR BLOGATHON:

I hosted my first blogathon waaay back during a cold and blizzard-y New York City weekend six months ago.

As I make my way through each essay, I see that the collaborative teams chosen by these bloggers show a kind of love…or, just love actually, in the teams’ relationships. For a writer-director to have an actor corporeally embody his ( her ) words and vision is a dream. For an actor to have a character so vivid to inhabit…or the blank canvas to paint with must be wonderfully creative.

These entries have served to make me want to revisit these films or see them for the first time. And for that, I am grateful for their contributions. So here they are again. Good reading for a cold winter’s night. Good reading for a warm summer’s day. Good reading:

KRAMER - TRACY  WILDER - HOLDEN
The Basement Tan                                        Blog of the Darned

CUKOR - HEPBURN ( KEEPER of the FLAME )  WITNEY - ROGERS ( III )
B Noir Detour                                            Brian Camp’s Film & Anime Blog

BUTLER - CROSBY Collaboration  STURGES - McCREA ( II )
Caftan Woman                                            Cary Grant Won’t Eat You

CASSAVETES - ROWLANDS Collaboration  HITCHCOCK - NOTORIOUS ( I )
Christy’s Inkwells                                                       Cinema Cities

CAPRA - ARTHUR COLLABORATION  LOVE ON THE RUN ( II )
Cinema Crossroads                                           Cinema Scribblings

LUPINO and WALSH PREMINGER - TIERNEY COLLABORATION
CineMaven’s Essays from the Couch                           Crimson Kimono

GRIFFITH - GISH Collaboration  HITCHCOCK AND GRACE
Critica Retrô                                                   Defiant Success

KUROSAWA & NAKADAI ( X )
F For Films

OZU - HARA ( IIII )  KUROSAWA & MIFUNE Collaboration
Film Critique                                                       Film Vulture

KAZAN & BRANDO Collaboration LANG & SCARLET STREET
Girls Do Film                                            Laura’s Miscellaneous Musings

 KUROSAWA - TAKASHI SHIMURA  WALTERS - ESTHER WILLIAMS
L
e Mot du Cinephiliaque                         Love Letters to Old Hollywood

NIVEN & POWELL:PRESSBURGER
Make Mine Criterion!

SIRK - HUDSON Collaborations  HAWKS - JOHN WAYNE
Meredy.com                                                  The Midnite Drive – In

WYLER and HEPBURN
The Motion Pictures

WALSH - CAGNEY COLLABORATION  TOD BROWNING & LON CHANEY
Movie Classics                                                  Movies Silently

DeMILLE & SWANSON ( LEGENDS ) - I  VON STERNBERG - DIETRICH
Now Voyaging                                                Old Hollywood Films

WILDER & LEMMON Collaboration  FORD - WAYNE ( %22STAGECOACH%22 ) II
Once Upon A Screen                                     Outspoken and Freckled

WOODY - POWELL : LOY  MINNELLI - GARLAND
Phyllis Loves Movies                                          Pop Culture Pundit

FORD - WAYNE  HUSTON & BOGIE
Portraits by Jenni                                           Second Sight Cinema

WOOD - LUGOSI Collaboration  KOSTER - STEWART
Serendipitous Anachronisms                                    Silver Scenes

WYLER - DAVIS ( %22THE LETTER%22 )  KARLSON - PAYNE ( %22KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL%22 )
Silver Screenings                                           Speakeasy

HAWKS & GRANT ( %22Only Angels Have Wings%22 )HOWARD HAWKS & CARY GRANT
Spontaneous Whimsy

MYRNA LOY in %22PENTHOUSE%22   SANDRICH - FRED&GINGER
The Stop Button                                         Wolffian Classic Movie Digest

LANG - BENNETT Collaboration
The Wonderful World of Cinema

 

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REEL INFATUATION

<< SIGH! >>

The REEL INFATUATION Blogathon hosted by Front & Frock and Silver Screenings is right up my alley.

BLOGATHON ( REEL INFATUATION - 6 : 13 ~ 17 : 2016 )

Can you be in love with someone you’ve never met? Sure you can. It happens all the time. I bought Tiger Beat magazine in the 60’s, mooning over the Tys, the Tabs and the Troys. Then David Cassidy came along ( “I Woke Up In Love This Morning I Think I Love You ~ which I sang a duet with, with Citizen Screen at Miceli’s at the end of the TCMFF’16 film festival ) in the 70’s…and there were folks in between. My heart and soul belong to movies though; classic movies. There is Gable & Flynn, Power & Peck. But really now…girls don’t have crushes and infatuations on men like that. Lust is the more appropriate carnal response for men like them, doncha think?

My reel crushes are boys-next-door. You know the type: soft, kind, picnic-nice, full of jokes, good cheer, winning smile, boyish charm and friendship. Guess I was always attracted to the collegiate-type no matter the decade. My tip-top favorites are boys like this, past and present:

CRUSHING ( DAVID MANNERS )( CRUSHING ) JEFFREY LYNNCRUSHING ( RICHARD CARLSON )
David Manners                       Jeffrey Lynn                               Richard Carlson
The Mummy”                    “Four Daughters”                         “Hold That Ghost

CRUSHING ( PAUL RUDD )CRUSHING ( RYAN REYNOLDS )CRUSHING ( TIMOTHY BOTTOMS
Paul Rudd                           Ryan Reynolds                         Timothy Bottoms
The 40-Year Old                 “Just Friends”                         “The Paper Chase
Virgin” “Clueless”                 “The Proposal”                    “The Last Picture Show

KYLE JOHNSON ( REEL INFATUATION ) Kyle Johnson “The Learning Tree
( be still my 17-year old heart. )

But my reel infatuation is on Singleton.

LOVE LETTERS ( JENNIFER JONES )

I know. HOW could I jump the gender fence like this. Reading the fine print very carefully for this blogathon, one’s crush should be on a character in the movies, so I just had to jump over. What’s not to love ( if you’re a fan ) about Jennifer Jones as SINGLETON in Love Letters ( 1945 ).

LOVE LETTERS ( THE LETTER ) LOVE LETTERS ( X )

Singleton has lost her memory. And she’s been in prison for murder; a murder she doesn’t remember even committing. I feel protective of her as does everyone around her in this movie. This includes her best friend Dilly ( the beautiful Ann Richards ) and the romantic and broken Allen ( Joseph Cotten ) who, unbeknownst to Singleton, is already in love with her thanks to the love letters he’s written for her wastrel, now murdered husband.

The draw for me is her guilelessness. She’s direct and forthright without hidden agenda…or malice. She’s winning and adorable. Her memory loss has given her a clean slate and she sees life simply. She’s charmingly truthful. 

LOVE LETTERS ( VI )

SINGLETON: “Well you see, I’ve thought of you so much.”

ALLEN:           “Think you should admit that?

SINGLETON: “Why not? I wanted to tell you that I thought of you. And you were glad to hear it. Don’t look startled, you were glad. So why shouldn’t I tell you.”


Her vulnerability is a magnet. Her truthfulness catches one off-guard. At her trial, she plainly says she can’t remember the events of the night that brought her to court. She says she does not WANT to remember. She’s sexy in a wholesome way:

LOVE LETTERS ( XIII )

“That’s the difference between us. You’re unhappy ‘cause that can never happen again.  And I’m happy because it happened once.”

There’s an unstoppable-force meets an immovable-object quality to what both Allen and Singleton want. They want two opposite things; one wants to remember, the other wants her to forget. When a painful memory creeps up on her and freaks her out, how can you help not feel bad for her. She’s lost. And breaks my heart. I feel sorry for them both. I want her to be well. But what if her being well meant losing her.

LOVE LETTERS ( XV ) LOVE LETTERS ( VIII )

This is silly. This is crazy. This is futile. This is insane. It’s so hard to discuss a crush in a rational public way other than to say goo-gah gobbledy goo. I risk sounding like a blithering idiot. ( LOL! I know…too late. ) I can only hope to be understood. And if I’m not…does it really matter? 

LOVE LETTERS ( V )

Alright, if you’re so self-possessed, go on, tell me. Go to the comments section below and tell me what character YOU have a crush on in the movies. Or, if you see HOW hard a job it is to talk rationally about a screen rush, you can just check out the other entries in this blogathon. My fellow bloggers will be much more eloquent than I in writing about who their reel infatuations are. Won’t you please click on the banner below to read about their cinematic heart throbs? The five-day recaps are just a click away:

BLOGATHON ( REEL INFATUATION ~ II )

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